I want to be the greatest nurse ever

I want to be the greatest nurse ever

Melody found out about her HIV status through blood transfusion at school. If you were negative you would get a letter reference thanking you for saving someone’s life. Melody waited, until she actually finished school, but her letter reference never came out. She was so stressed out, and didn’t have anyone to talk to. Melody tried to kill herself three times.

“My aunt has been of great support to me. I now have big dreams. I’m actually using the money I earn through my business to sending myself to school. I love to become a nurse because I know how it feels to be sick. So I think I’ll be able to help other people like other nurses have done to me. I want to be the greatest nurse ever.”

"So I think I’ll be able to help other people like other nurses have done to me"

Documentary for advocacy

Young people living with HIV in Zimbabwe are leading change: they expressed the need for a platform to create a better understanding of the gaps in health and education services and to lobby for increased support. Therefore, a documentary series has been developed showcasing stories of four young people living with HIV.

Having young people living with HIV in the lead in the initiation and development of the documentary, and being the stars of the documentary themselves, proved to be an empowering process. It helped to give them a voice and agency in challenging the dominant stereotypes and labelling of young people living with HIV.

The meaningful involvement of young people ensured that the documentary messages are based on the realities and the needs on the ground. Because, who else than young people know best what young people need?

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